11 Notes

Kids these days got no work ethic.
From the Funny Pages 1937.

Kids these days got no work ethic.

From the Funny Pages 1937.

2 Notes

Wednesdays on the CW.

Wednesdays on the CW.

92 Notes

When is it not a good time to take an invisibility pill?

When is it not a good time to take an invisibility pill?

1 Notes

6 Notes

From 1941, from the same syndicate that gave the world Dick Tracy eleven years earlier, comes Steamer Kelly one of the few fire fighter comic characters who like all the others, except for Smokey Stover, didn’t last very long.

I don’t know why though, I mean who would have ever thought of a villain based on the loveable concept of a clown only evil and named… wait a minute.


This makes me think that perhaps the other Steamer villains, Percy Flightless Arctic Water Fowl and Half a Head, who was angry for Kelly not pulling him out of a burning house fast enough, might also not have been very original.  

From 1941, from the same syndicate that gave the world Dick Tracy eleven years earlier, comes Steamer Kelly one of the few fire fighter comic characters who like all the others, except for Smokey Stover, didn’t last very long.

I don’t know why though, I mean who would have ever thought of a villain based on the loveable concept of a clown only evil and named… wait a minute.

This makes me think that perhaps the other Steamer villains, Percy Flightless Arctic Water Fowl and Half a Head, who was angry for Kelly not pulling him out of a burning house fast enough, might also not have been very original.  

7 Notes

There is obsession and then there are these two, Archie needs to die if for no other reason than to let these two get on with their lives. 

There is obsession and then there are these two, Archie needs to die if for no other reason than to let these two get on with their lives. 

33 Notes

michaelallanleonard:

Wonder Woman by crisquinu

6 Notes

alternateworldcomics:

Wonder Women on my Refrigerator  on Flickr.

4 Notes

alternateworldcomics:

What’s this, Lois Lane muling for Tupperware? I guess plucky girl reporters in the 60s didn’t make as much as I thought they did.
The image above comes from a comic book called, as you can see on the cover, Tupperware Dating Party, which it seems features one Dorothy Dealer. (I can hardly wait for the Post Modern reboot on THAT character!)
A freebie produced something around 1968 that was given to woman thinking about joining the cult of… I mean becoming a Tupperware distributer.
It was published by Common Comics, which was a subsidy of American Comic Group, the comic company known mainly for a long string of mild “horror” comics and a fat little character known as Herbie, or sometimes the Fat Fury.
They got out of regular comics in the 60s, but still produced them for companies like Sears, Tupperware and others.
The art in this one was supplied by Kurt Schaffenberger, the artist who for over ten years was THE artist for Lois Lane, becoming so iconic that he was even brought in to draw her in comics being done by other artists so that she always looked the same.
It seems he also pulled her out for this item as well, despite being called “dealer” Ruby Robins and given a by the unknown colorist a somewhat different hair color, (not Lois’s natural blue from Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane,) that’s Lois Lane, down to the little Jackie Kennedy hat she sported in her adventures at DC at the same time.
Perhaps she needed the extra income to make up for all the time she spent being shrunk, trapped in the Phantom Zone, tossed around in time, being abducted by aliens and going though one weird transformation after another.

alternateworldcomics:

What’s this, Lois Lane muling for Tupperware? I guess plucky girl reporters in the 60s didn’t make as much as I thought they did.

The image above comes from a comic book called, as you can see on the cover, Tupperware Dating Party, which it seems features one Dorothy Dealer. (I can hardly wait for the Post Modern reboot on THAT character!)

A freebie produced something around 1968 that was given to woman thinking about joining the cult of… I mean becoming a Tupperware distributer.

It was published by Common Comics, which was a subsidy of American Comic Group, the comic company known mainly for a long string of mild “horror” comics and a fat little character known as Herbie, or sometimes the Fat Fury.

They got out of regular comics in the 60s, but still produced them for companies like Sears, Tupperware and others.

The art in this one was supplied by Kurt Schaffenberger, the artist who for over ten years was THE artist for Lois Lane, becoming so iconic that he was even brought in to draw her in comics being done by other artists so that she always looked the same.

It seems he also pulled her out for this item as well, despite being called “dealer” Ruby Robins and given a by the unknown colorist a somewhat different hair color, (not Lois’s natural blue from Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane,) that’s Lois Lane, down to the little Jackie Kennedy hat she sported in her adventures at DC at the same time.

Perhaps she needed the extra income to make up for all the time she spent being shrunk, trapped in the Phantom Zone, tossed around in time, being abducted by aliens and going though one weird transformation after another.

16 Notes

alternateworldcomics:

It pleases mademoiselle..? OH!

alternateworldcomics:

It pleases mademoiselle..? OH!

42 Notes

thehappysorceress:

Supergirl by Adam Huntley

35 Notes

lectorconstante:

¡Alehop!
(lo pinta Mahmud Asrar)

lectorconstante:

¡Alehop!

(lo pinta Mahmud Asrar)

7 Notes

32 Notes

Out of the closet and into the sky!

Wait… Silver-Age Robin is only 5 feet tall?

And we are the .0099%

DC Comics on sale 50 years ago this April. 

3 Notes

(via Aw Yeah Comics! #3 (Issue))